Crown Molding Designs and Design Variations

jesser1224 says:
If you have any questions on miter cuts, for crown molding or anything, you can contact me at jesset...... more
If you have any questions on miter cuts, for crown molding or anything, you can contact me at jessethehandyman@aol.com and I'll be happy to answer any questions
 
See options for mixing-and-matching crown molding to create a perfect solution for any room.

Successfully adding crown molding is like the story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears -- you don't want your installation to be too big or too small. You want it to be just right.

For example, a multi-element installation could be perfect in a room with a ceiling that's 10 feet high. But nail those identical moldings in a room with an 8-foot-high ceiling and you'll feel that you need to duck to avoid bumping your head. On the other hand, combining base and cove molding can be the right proportion in a room with an 8-foot-high ceiling, but it would be lost on top of a 10-foot-high wall.

As a general rule, the need for restraint diminishes as ceiling height increases. When a wall reaches a height of 10 feet or more, you can pretty well throw caution to the wind and pursue any molding combination your ambition and budget allow.

The best way to judge the scale of a molding installation is to assemble a sample that's 2 or 3 feet long, then tack it at ceiling level. After looking at it for a few days, you'll be able to tell whether it's too big, too small, or just right.

Combining standard moldings
There are thousands of ways to combine the hundreds of standard molding profiles to achieve exactly the look you want. These examples merely hint at the variety that's available.

In multi-element installations, you'll often see baseboard molding applied to the wall, as in options 1, 2, and 8, but sometimes it goes on both wall and ceiling, as shown in Option 7. Option 6 shows a similar effect, but this time casing is applied to the ceiling. By using the same base and casing profiles you installed elsewhere in the room, you'll unify the design.

Don't let the molding names get in the way of assembling a pleasing crown molding. In fact, you can achieve the effect of crown molding without using actual crown molding. Study the combinations of cove, base cap, and bed moldings shown on these pages. Several of the options show S4S stock, which is lumberman's lingo for smooth four sides. Your lumberyard will probably have stain-grade S4S in a variety of sizes, or you can rip your own from dimensional lumber.

Options 9 and 10 show rectangles with Xs, which indicate lumber that serves as blocking. The blocking is 1x, and 2x lumber provides nailing surfaces and support for the moldings.

Option 1
Option 2
Option 3
Option 4
Option 5
Option 6
Option 7
Option 8
Option 9
Option 10

 

Comments (2)
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jesser1224 wrote:

If you have any questions on miter cuts, for crown molding or anything, you can contact me at jessethehandyman@aol.com and I'll be happy to answer any questions

3/20/2010 09:01:21 PM Report Abuse
anonymous wrote:

yes i have angled ceilings and want to install crown moulding how do i figure out the angle before i make the cut?

12/29/2009 08:00:19 PM Report Abuse
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