Biscuit Joinery

Learn the process of using a plate joiner for biscuit joinery to create strong joints.

Intro

A plate joiner represents a quantum leap in woodworking, permitting amateurs to quickly and easily make joints that rival the strength of those built with traditional mortise-and-tenon joinery. And you'll get those results without serving a yearlong apprenticeship. After a few minutes of reading the tool's instruction manual, you're ready to make strong joints.

The biscuit joint is actually a variation of the mortise and tenon, so it shares the element of strength. The biscuit functions as a loose tenon that fits into the arced mortises formed by the tool's circular blade.

By adjusting the depth of cut, you can choose biscuits of various sizes.

Step 1

To make a butt joint for a box, begin by marking the centerlines of the biscuits' locations onto the boards. These marks are adjacent to the surface where you cut the slots, guiding you to accurately position the tool.

Step 2

Clamp the workpiece to the table. Lock the flip-down fence at the front of the joiner at the 90-degree position. Set the fence's height so that the slot is approximately centered in the stock's thickness. Align the guide notch on the joiner with the centerline, turn on the joiner, then push it forward to cut the slots.

Step 3

Note that you cut the other pair of slots in the board's side. Do a dry assembly (no glue) to check the joint's fit. Squeeze a puddle of glue onto a scrap board and brush glue onto the biscuits and into the slots. Clamp the assembly until the glue sets.


Comments (1)
8089760899
allkind-com-au wrote:

The mortise and tenon one of the stronger timber joints around.

12/13/2011 01:18:23 PM Report Abuse
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