Framing a Curved Wall

This story shows how to frame a curved wall.

Intro

A curved wall can be a simple sweeping arc or an undulating wave that moves back and forth. Either way, a curved wall will add interest and drama to any room.

A flexible metal track speeds and simplifies the construction of the wall whether you utilize metal or wood studs. The track shown is also available in a model that accommodates 2x6 studs. Making your own curved track from standard channel is a bit tedious but not especially difficult. Making plates from solid wood or laminated plywood is another option, but it can consume significant amounts of both materials and time.

One key design consideration is the radius of the curve. The radius you choose determines the spacing of the studs. Spacing the studs closely can give a smoother look to your finished wall.

Utilize these same construction techniques to make barrel vaults and wavy ceilings.

Checklist

Time
Allow 20 minutes per linear foot of wall

Tools
Permanent marker, chalk line, plumb bob with nylon line, strip of scrap hardboard, drill/driver, drill bits, metal snips, masking tape, locking-grip pliers

Skills
Measuring, using a plumb bob, driving fasteners

Prep
Design the shape of the wall.

Materials
Flexible track for the top and bottom of the wall, studs, fasteners

Step 1

Draw the curve on the floor with a permanent marker. To get a smooth curve, make a giant compass from a strip of hardboard or plywood. Tap a nail through the hardboard into the floor for the pivot point. Drill a hole at the other end at the desired radius for the curve; put the marker tip through the hole and draw.

Step 2

Bend the track to shape, and hold the curve while you drive screws through the tabs into the metal strip. For best results, use No. 8X1/2-inch self-drilling screws. Driving a screw through every tab on both sides gives the strongest results.

Step 3

After you've completed the first track, turn it over to use as a template to shape the top track. The top track is a mirror image of the bottom. Attach the second track to the first with locking-grip pliers at one end, shape the curve, then secure the other end with another pair of locking-grip pliers. Drive the screws.

Step 4

Attach the bottom track to the floor, and use a plumb bob to position the ceiling track. Temporarily place a few studs into the tracks to support the upper track. Check the alignment of the tracks at both ends and at the middle.

Step 5

Twist the studs into the tracks, and plumb them before driving screws through the track to secure them. You can use either wood or metal studs. For the smoothest wall surface, space the studs closely together, never exceeding the spacing recommended.


Comments (2)
8498464977
jndear1125 wrote:

scrutonjomily its call flex c trac with hammer lock.If you need help you can also order the angles for $11 they will send the blue prints for you no matter how large. I went on youtube and its on there with lots of video how to's with the trac. Good luck hope this helps

11/11/2014 12:27:53 AM Report Abuse
scrutonjomily wrote:

where can you buy the flexible metal track for steele stud walls?

6/26/2014 09:27:25 PM Report Abuse
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