Tub Spout Repair and Installation

Tub Spouts

A tub spout may be screwed onto a threaded pipe or anchored to a nonthreaded pipe with a setscrew. Before you start to unscrew a spout, check underneath to see if there is a setscrew.

If water seeps from behind the spout, it may be attached to a threaded pipe that is loose. Remove the pipe, wrap its threads with pipe-thread tape, and use a pipe wrench to tighten it.

If possible, spend a little more for a brass spout. It will last longer than a bargain-bin spout, which may be made of thin metal or even plastic that wears and stains quickly.

Checklist

Time
Less than an hour for most repairs

Tools
Screwdrivers, hex wrench, groove-joint pliers, pipe wrench, caulk gun

Skills
Unscrewing and reinstalling a spout

Prep
There is no need to shut off the water; place a towel in the bottom of the tub to catch any debris or caulk

Materials
New spout, pipe-thread tape, tub-and-tile caulk

Step One

Use groove-joint pliers or a pipe wrench to remove an old spout that is threaded on. Clean the end of the pipe and scrape away any caulk on the wall. Wrap the pipe threads clockwise with two or three turns of pipe-thread tape.

Step Two

Screw on the new spout by hand. Wrap masking tape or a cloth around the spout, or wrap electrician's tape around the jaws of groove-joint pliers, and tighten the spout firmly. If the pipe is copper, avoid overtightening, which can strip the threads.

Stepscrews: Removing a Spout Held with a Hex-head Screw

Some spouts attach with a setscrew. Loosen the screw with a hex wrench and slide off the spout.


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One Hour or Less

Three simple projects to cross off of your to-do list -- just print these instructions and begin!


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